The Newspaper of Northgate High

Becoming an “only” child: lonesome or luxurious?

October 5, 2016

Recently, as we eagerly waved goodbye to our older siblings (secretly wondering if they’ll survive without us), we had mixed feelings. On the one hand, no more sharing; no more hiding the good food in the back of the fridge; no more annoying older sibling, who did everything first and did everything better. However, we all acknowledged recently we started to get the feeling that we might just miss these older siblings. No more free cash lying around in their room, up for grabs; no more blaming the dirty dish in the sink on them; no more family dinners. So, in truth, are we sad or glad to be a “new” only child?

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Katie Morris (right) with older brother Brian Morris (left) doing arts and crafts together.

Katie:

With two older brothers, I’m used to a bustling household. My oldest brother is now a senior at Syracuse University and my other brother is a freshman at Ohio State University. As much as it is an adjustment for my brother to start college, it is for me too at home, having to get used to a practically empty house. With just my parents and I, it’s too quiet for me. Although I can’t wait for these next two years of the house all to myself and all of the benefits that come along with it, I can’t help but feel pretty sad that this chapter of my brothers and my life is over.

Ian:

I’ve grown up my whole life with my sister being there whenever she’s needed. We’ve definitely had our differences, but we have always been filled with the most love towards each other. For 16 years of my life, my sister has been helping me and now she is moving away and there is a variety of mixed feelings about one less head in the house. Now attending Oregon State University, she leaves me the only child at home.

Liv:

I’ve grown up my whole life with my sister by my side. We constantly fight, but constantly make up, and we stay best friends through all the ups and downs. She just left for University of Santa Cruz, and I don’t know if I’m ready to experience life without her. Not fighting with her over clothes, or over who gets to pick the tv show will definitely be nice, but I’m going to miss having someone to help me pick outfits, and go on late night ice cream trips with.

Katie:

One thing that I can definitely get used to is the cleanliness. My car, that I finally don’t have to share anymore, smells like perfume instead of dirty socks. I can clean the car and have it stay that way for more than 24 hours. I don’t have to go down for a crime I didn’t commit, like emptying the clean clothes bin on the ground or drinking the last of the milk. The joint bathroom is now my own. What’s more, there will be no more dried up toothpaste or empty toilet paper rolls or damp towels lying in a heap on the floor. I can clear out my brothers’ surprisingly numerous collection of shampoo bottles, shaving cream, and face washes. From now on, I run this tidy place.

Ian:

There won’t be too much change in chores. I possibly might take over her list of chores to help out my parents with what they ask for. Overall the chores won’t be too much of a burden because my chores consisted of more than hers, which always caused problems but I needed to do them anyways. It will be different having more chores and not as many people helping even though her chores were much easier. Of course, I’ll expect her allowance too.

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Livia Doporto (right) and sister Addison Doporto (left) playing musical instruments together .

Liv:

The house might be cleaner once she leaves. The mess she and I create will be cut in half, but there will be more of a burden to clean the house. Without her, there’s two less hands helping with everything. I’ll have to start doing some of her chores. More vacuuming, more dishes, and more walking the dog. Her leaving definitely adds some things to my to do list. But I also now have my own bathroom. No more fighting over who gets to shower or use the hair straightener first.  I even have an extra closet now.

Katie:

As the youngest of three, it is finally my turn to have all of my parents’ attention. I can pick what we want for dinner, what we watch on TV or what we buy at Costco. However, this could be a blessing or a curse. When it comes to getting in trouble, there’s no diversion now. Previously, my brothers would occupy my parents’ time because of their boy-liness, leaving me free to fly under the radar. Now, though, I am in the constant spotlight and there is no one to hide behind.

Ian:

The biggest difference with my sister gone is the parental attention shift. The attention level will stay mostly at a constant rate because my parents understand that I need my personal space even if they don’t want to admit it. My mother will be the person that will most likely need the most attention. She will be sad that one of her children left her, so I’m going to have to force my dad to babysit her to make sure she’s not too sad. The attention on me will be about the same, but there will be instances where the attention level on me will increase. Such as at my baseball games now, both parents will be able to come and hold up posters saying embarrassing things. Overall, I won’t have a problem with the attention level it’s something new and it can’t be too bad.

Liv:

Now that my sister has left, it’s just me and my parents. I’m going to get all the attention all the time with no buffer in the house. That might be nice sometimes. I won’t have to compromise on decisions, or share everything, but I will also have all eyes on me all the time. I won’t be able to get away with anything and I won’t have anyone to take half the blame for things.

Katie:

As much as I try to pretend the opposite is true, there is no doubt that I’ll miss my brothers while they’re at college. I’ll miss the Sunday nights where we would all sit watching TV together, avoiding our homework. And I won’t see their faces, complete with the snide grins, in the hallways ever again. And I don’t know what I’ll do without our  time together, spent talking about our days, people that pushed our buttons, and new events going on in our lives. But I know that our relationship will grow even more.

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Ian Villers (right) with Cori Villers (left) playing outdoors.

Ian:

Another thing that will be different in the house is the amount of people to talk to, and this turns into loneliness. Having four people in the house is a huge difference than three because there’s not an even number if two people go do something together. The lonely stage will last for a few days or weeks, but my family will prevail and figure out a way to have fun even without the funniest person in my family at home.

Liv:

My sister is lucky she left first. She gets to go and be independent, make new friends, have new adventures. I’m going to be in the same place, with the same people, just without my best friend. I’ll be lonely doing homework by myself on weekday nights, and when I’m up late watching movies without my movie buddy. Or on weekend mornings when we used to be bagels. I’m sure we will talk all the time, but it’s not gonna be like having her home to talk to. I know I’ll be lonely without her in the house, but she’s not going to be gone forever. I’ll count down the days until she comes home for Thanksgiving Break, then Christmas, and Spring Break, and summer. And when she’s finally home it will be like she never left, with everything back to normal, and I’ll have my best friend back.

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